Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

(Footprints Without Feet)  

For 

Coming H. S. Final Exam 

 

  

By

Growhills Writers’ Board

 

  

 

Growhills Publishing

Barpeta, Assam

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Supplementary Reader (Footprints Without Feet), For Coming H. S. Final  Examination by Growhills Writers’ Board,  Published by Growhills Publishing, Barpeta (Assam)

 

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SYLLABUS

H.S. 2nd Year English Supplementary Reader (Footprints Without Feet)

Mark-15

1. The Tiger King – By Kalki 

2. Journey to the End of the Earth  -By Tishani Doshi 

3. On the Face of It -By Susan Hill 

4. Memoirs of Childhood  -By Zitkala-Sa and Bama 

5. The Enemy – By Pearl S. Buck 

6. Magh Bihu or Maghar Domahi -By Prafulla Dutt Goswami.

………………………………..

THE TIGER KING

-Kalki

TEXTUAL QUESTION-ANSWERS 

A. Read and Find Out  (Each bearing 2 Marks)

Q.1. Who was the Tiger King? Why does he get that name? H. S. ’13

Ans: The Maharaja of Pratibandarpuram, Jung Bahadur is known as the Tiger King.

He got the name ‘Tiger King’ because the astrologer predicted that the king’s death would come from a tiger.

Q.2. What did the royal infant grow up to be?

Ans: With the passing of time, the royal infant grew taller and stronger. He drank the milk of an English cow and was tutored by an Englishman. At the age of twenty, he became the king of the state and then began to hunt his enemies – the tigers.

Q.3. What will the Maharaja do to find the required number of tigers to kill?

Ans: After killing about seventy tigers, the tiger population in the state became extinct. Then he wanted to marry a prince from a state with a tiger population. The dewan (minister) found a girl and in this way, the king was able to kill the required number of tigers.

Q.4. How will the Maharaja prepare himself for the hundredth tiger which was supposed to decide his fate?

Ans: The king found it difficult to have a hundred tigers killed. Then the dewan, realizing the seriousness of the situation, bought a tiger from people’s park in Madras. The tiger was left in the forest where the king was hunting. The king took careful aim and shot it, but his aim missed the target.

Q.5. What will now happen to the astrologer? Do you think the prophecy was indisputably disproved?

Ans: The king was destined to be killed by a tiger. Hence in spite of his mission of killing a hundred tigers, he was not able to fulfil his mission. The hundredth tiger survived to be killed by a hunter, not by the king. Hence this prophecy came true.

B. Reading with Insight  (Each Question bears 5 Marks)

Q.1. The story is a satire on the conceit of those in power. How does the author employ the literary device of dramatic irony in the story?

Ans: The story entitled ‘The Tiger King’ is a satire on the conceit of those in power.  The chief astrologer assured him that as the king was born in the hour of Bull he would be killed by a tiger. But the king could not accept the truth.

To get rid of being killed by a tiger, the king continued to hunt tigers and was able to kill 99 tigers and felt safe.

But ironically the hundredth tiger was not killed by the king as he missed the target. Another hunter killed the tiger only to hide the fact. 

Here the irony is that the king was killed by a tiger not of flesh and blood but by a tiger made of wood.

The irony illustrates that none can avoid destiny.

Q.2. What is the author’s indirect comment on subjecting innocent animals to the willfullness of human beings?

Ans: The author has not made a direct comment on the indiscriminate killing of tigers. But he shows great sympathy towards such beautiful animals.

The Tiger King killed almost all the tigers found in his kingdom. Consequently, the tiger population in the state got extinct. Then he married a girl from such a state which had a large population of tigers. In each visit to his father-in-law’s house, he used to kill 6 or 7 tigers. Thus he managed to kill ninety-nine tigers. But the hundredth tiger eluded the king and eventually, he was killed by a wooden tiger. The writer also mentioned the cruelty of the British officials who killed such a beautiful animal only for pleasure.

Q.3. How would you describe the behaviour of the Maharaja’s minions towards him? Do you find them truly sincere towards him or are they driven by fear when they obey him? Do we find a similarity in today’s political order?

Ans: The behaviour of the Maharaja’s minions towards him is seemed to be driven by fear.  Flattery and docile submissiveness are the chief characteristics of them.

To illustrate their servile nature we can take the dealings of the chief astrologers. He disclosed the truth only when he was given assurance of safety. The dewan was also of the same nature. He shuddered at the sight of the gun. The shopkeeper was likewise a strange blending of flattery and cunningness. The wooden tiger cost only two annas. But he charged three hundred rupees.

There is a great similarity in today’s political leaders. We see that the politicians lie prostrate before their leaders to flatter them. Their main aim is to please their leaders.

Q.4. Can you relate instances of game-hunting among the rich and the powerful in the present times that illustrate the callousness of human beings towards wildlife?

Ans: Yes, there are ample instances of game-hunting among the rich and the powerful. Today we hear about the killing of deers, rhinos, elephants, and other wild animals which are on the verge of extinction. Only to get the tusk of an elephant, the horns of rhinos, the skins of tigers, people mercilessly kill them. 

Though there are laws against poaching wild animals yet in India the laws seem to be only in paper and books. No law seems to be in force and it is because of the interference of the political leaders.

Q.5. We need a new system for the age of ecology- a system which is embedded in the care of all people and also in the care of the Earth and all life upon it. Discuss.

Ans: The present-day world has faced a tremendous menace of environmental degradation and it has been facing a drastic challenge in ecological balance. Human being have become more and more indifferent to the wildlife. Only for pleasure, the natural objects are being degraded. The tigers, elephants, rhinos, deers etc. have been being killed mercilessly. Many animals and birds have got extinct forever because of human selfishness. Glaciers have been shrinking. The water level of the sea has risen up. The greenhouse effect has caused global warming.

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

ADDITIONAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

A.  Short Answer type Questions. (Each bearing 2 Marks)

Q.1. What did the Dewan do about procuring a tiger on pain of losing his job?

Ans: The Dewan for fear of losing his job, brought a tiger from People’s Park in Madras and set the tiger free in the forest where the Tiger King used to hunt. When the King saw the tiger, procured secretly by the Dewans, he shot it but unfortunately, the tiger did no die. Later on, it was killed by another hunter.

Q.2. How did the Tiger King celebrate the killing of the hundredth tiger? H. S. ’15

Ans: As the king did not find his hundredth tiger, the dewans brought a tiger from the public park in Madras and set it free in the forest where the king was waiting for a tiger to shoot. When he saw the tiger brought by the dewans, he aimed at the tiger and shot it. But unfortunately, the tiger did not die. Another hunter killed it to hide up the fact.

Q.3. What did the astrologer predict about the Tiger King? H. S. ’14, ’17

Ans: The astrologer predicted that the ‘Tiger King’ would be killed by a tiger as he was born in the hour of the Bull and the Bull and the Tigers are enemies. The prediction came true.

Q.3. What did the Maharaja decide to do when he remembered the astrologer’s prediction? H. S. ’19

Ans: When the Maharaja remembered the astrologer’s prediction that he would be killed by a tiger, he started hunting tigers and banned others to hunt tigers in his kingdom.

Q.4. How did the hundredth tiger take its revenge on the tiger king? H. S. ’20

Ans: The astrologer predicted that the king would be killed by a tiger. Then the king started killing tigers to avoid the prediction. But he failed to kill the hundredth tiger though he thought his mission to be fulfiled. Eventually, we see that the Tiger King presented a wooden tiger to his son. The wooden tiger was so uneven that there were some spikes on it. One of those spikes pierced the king’s hand and soon infection spread all over his arms. The royal surgeons performed an operation but failed to save his life. Thus the hundredth tiger took revenge upon the Tiger King.

B. Long Answer Type Questions (Each 7 Marks)

Q.1. Draw a character sketch of the Tiger King in your own words. H. S. ’15

Ans: The Tiger King was the Maharaja of Pratibandarpuram. His name was Jung Bahadur. He was born in the hour of the Bull. The astrologer predicted that as he was born in the hour of the Bull and the Bull and Tiger are enemies so he might meet his death by a tiger. As a remedy of becoming the victim of a tiger, the astrologer suggested that if he would kill as many as one hundred tigers, then he might get rid of it.

At the age of twenty, he became the king and took a bet of killing a hundred tigers so as to get rid of becoming the victim of a tiger.

He thus challenged his destiny and mercilessly began to kill tigers. After the killing of 70 tigers,  almost all the tigers of his state got extinct. Then he married a girl from a state with a large tiger population and thus he could manage to kill up to 99 tigers. But he could not get the hundredth tiger to kill. Then the Dewans procured a tiger from the public park in Madras and set the tiger free in the forest. Next day the king went for hunting and when he happened to see the tiger procured by the Dewans, he shot at the tiger. But unfortunately, the tiger did nor die.  Later on, it was killed by another hunter.

On the other hand, the Tiger King got satisfied after shooting the hundredth tiger and thought that his mission was fulfilled and no tiger would kill him.

But the irony was still awaiting him. On the third birthday celebration of a son of the king, a wooden tiger was bought by the king to present it to his son. The wooden tiger was uneven and the wood stood up like a quill all over it. One of those quills pierced into the  Maharaja’s right hand. He pulled it out but the wound got infected and eventually, the Tiger King died. 0 0 0

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

 

JOURNEY TO THE END OF THE EARTH

-Tishani Doshi

TEXTUAL QUESTION-ANSWERS 

A. Read and Find Out  (Each bearing 2 Marks)

Q. 1. How do geological phenomena help us know about the history of mankind?

Ans: Geological phenomena help us know about the history of humankind.  About six hundred and fifty million years ago a giant southern supercontinent did exist. The climate was much warmer. It had a huge variety of flora and fauna. It thrived for 500 million years. Finally, it broke into countries as they exist today.

Q.2. What are the indications for the future of humankind?

Ans: The rapid growth of human population and limited resources exerts pressure on land.  Day by day the natural balance among things have been breaking up. Ice caps are melting, ozone strata is depleting, fossil fuels have caused global temperature. All these indicate a menace to the future of mankind.

B. Reading with Insight Each bearing 7 Marks

Q.1. The world’s geological history is trapped in Antarctica. How is the study of the region useful to us?

Ans: Geological phenomena help us know about the history of humankind.  About six hundred and fifty million years ago a giant southern supercontinent did exist. The climate was much warmer. It had a huge variety of flora and fauna. It thrived for 500 million years. Finally, it broke into countries as they exist today.

The rapid growth of human population and limited resources exerts pressure on land.  Day by day the natural balance among things have been breaking up. Ice caps are melting, ozone strata is depleting, fossil fuels have caused global temperature. All these indicate a dread menace to the future of mankind.

Thus the study of Antarctica may help understand all these things. So the Study of Antarctica is useful to us.

Q.2. What are Geoff Green’s reasons for including high school students in the Students on Ice Expedition?

Ans: Geoff had some solid reasons why he included the high school students in his mission. He realized that our elder people could do nothing to our world. But the students of the high school are the future of the world. Their proper knowledge of the world will help them to take positive steps towards the safety of the degrading environment. Going to the end of the earth, they can understand, learn and realise the danger of global warming, ozone layer’s degradation and biodiversity problems.

He expects, such an expedition will increase the awareness about the environment of the world. They can realise the real danger of seeing the ice caps melting and collapsing due to global warming.

Q.3. Take care of the small things and the big things will take care of themselves.’ What is the relevance of this statement in the context of the Antarctic environment?

Ans: Antarctica is on the far south point of the globe. It has quite a simple natural ecosystem. It lacks bio-diversity. It is the perfect place to study how little changes in the environment can have big repercussion. The very small one-celled photo planktons are the grasses of the sea. They nourish and sustain the entire Southern’s Ocean food chain. They use solar energy. They assimilate carbon and synthesise organic compounds. Further depletion of the ozone layer will affect the activities of the photo planktons. Consequently, the whole marine life of animals and birds has gone under changes.

These small things have to be taken care of. The author says, ‘if they are taken care of, then the big things will fall into places.’

Q.4. Why is Antarctica the place to go to understand the earth’s present, past and future?

Ans: To visit Antarctica is to be a part of the Earth’s history. About 650 million years ago there was a giant supercontinent in the south which was called ‘Gondwana’. India and Antarctica were parts of the same landmass. Things were quite different then. Humans had not arrived on the Earth. The climate of Antarctica was much warmer. It had a huge variety of flora and fauna. Dinosaurs became extinct. The age of mammal began. The landmass was forced to be separated into countries as they exist today.

The 90 per cent of the Earth’s total ice volume is stored in Antarctica. There are no trees, buildings and human settlements.

Antarctica also provides a warning for the future. If global warming keeps on increasing, it will bring ruinous results. The future depletion of the ozone layers will affect sea animals, vegetation and human adversely. A small change in the climate condition of Antarctica will bring a great change to the condition of the entire earth.

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

ADDITIONAL QUESTION-ANSWER

A.  Short Answer type Questions. (Each bearing 2 Marks)

Q.1. Describe the author’s walking experience on the ocean in the Antarctic circle.

Ans: The Russain research ship managed to place herself into a thick stretch of ice. They were instructed to climb down the gangplank and walk on the ocean. Underneath their feet was a metre thick ice pack. And below it was 180 metres living, breathing saltwater. 

Q.2. What is Gondwana?

Ans: The Gondwana was a giant amalgamated southern supercontinent. There, the climate was much warmer and a huge variety of flora and fauna existed. The Gondwana thrived for 500 million years. Later the landmass was forced to separate into countries, shaping the globe much as we know it today.

Q.3. How did the author reach Antarctica?

Ans: The author boarded a Russian Research ship called ‘The Academik Shokalskiy’. It was heading Antarctica. It is the coldest, driest and windiest continent of the world. His journey began 13.09 degrees north of the Equator in Madras. He had to cross nine time zones, six checkpoints, three bodies of water and at least three ecospheres.

Q.4. What was the purpose of the visit to Antarctica?

Ans: The purpose of the visit to Antarctica was to understand how real was the threat of global warming and depletion of the ozone layers. Besides this, the author visited Antarctica to understand the cordilleran folds, ozone and carbon.

Q.5. How has Antarctica reminded relatively pristine?

Ans: The impact of climate change is still very little in Antarctica. Because it is the only place on the Earth which has never sustained a human population and thereof has remained relatively pristine in this respect. 0 0 0

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

 

THE ENEMY

-Pearl S. Buck

SELECT  QUESTION-ANSWERS 

A.  Short Answer Type Question ( Each bearing 2 Marks)

Q.1. Who was Mr. Sadao? Where was his house?

Ans: Mr. Sadao was a Japanse surgeon. He studied medicine in America.

His house was on a spot of the Japanese coast. It was a low square stone house which was set upon rocks.

Q.2. What kind of relationship did Dr. Sadao share with his father?

Ans: Sadao shared a very serious relationship with his father. His father was very enthusiastic concerning Sadao’s education.  He never played nor joked with his son. He sent Sadao to America at the age of twenty-two to study surgery and medicine. Sadao came back to Japan at thirty after the completion of his study.

Q.3. What was the attitude of Sadao and his wife towards the wounded man? What did they decide to do with the man?

or

What was the initial reaction of Dr. Sadao and Hana on seeing he wounded soldier?

Ans: First, when Dr. Sadao and his wife Hana saw the wounded soldier laying on the sea-shore they thought of putting the man back into the sea. But their conscience forbade them to do so.

Finally, they decided to carry the wounded soldier to their home, in spite of the fact that he was an American, their enemy. They lifted him together and carried to their house and Sadao and Hana decided to treat the man and saved that moribund soldier.

Q.4. Who was Hana? Where did Dr. Sadao meet her? H. S. ’19

Ans: Hana was the wife of Dr. Sadao, a reputed Japanese surgeon. She was a very caring, loving and sympathetic woman. 

Dr. Sadao met her at a party held for foreign students at an American professor’s house.

Q.5. How did Dr. Sadao and Hana come to know that the man was an American, a prisoner of war and an enemy?

Ans: When Dr. Sadao and Hana reached the man, he was lying unconscious on the sea-shore. He was deeply wounded.  An old cap stuck to his head which had the name ‘U. S. Navy’ written on it.  After close inspection, they found out that the man was a white one.

Thus they come to know that the white man was an American, a prisoner of war and an enemy to their land.  

Q.6. When and where did Sadao marry Hana? How was their married life?

Ans: Dr. Sadao met Hana at a party held for foreign students at an American professor’s house and fell in love with her. But he had to wait to decide on marrying Hana until he was sure that she was Japanese. It was because his father would not have accepted her as his daughter-in-law unless she had been pure in her race. Thus after coming back to Japan, and when his family became sure that she was of purely Japanese origin, then Sadao married her with the traditional Japanese custom.

Their married life was a happy one and they loved each one deeply. Sadao had two children by her. 

Q. 7.  Who was Hana? What did she notice coming out of the mist? H. S. ’19

Ans: Hana was the wife of Dr. Sadao, a reputed Japanese surgeon. She was a very caring, loving and sympathetic woman. 

Hana noticed something black coming out of the mist. It was flung up out of the sea. After a moment, Hana along with her husband saw that it was a badly wounded American prisoner of war. 

Q. 8.  Why did the messenger come to Dr. Sadao? H.S. ’20

Ans: The messenger came to Dr. Sadao to take him to the palace as the old General was in pain.

B.  Long  Answer Type Questions. (Each bearing 7 Marks)

Q.1.Give a character sketch of Dr. Sadao.  

or

Write a character-sketch of Dr. Sadao Hoki as depicted in “The Enemy”. H. S. ’19

Ans: Dr. Sadao was a Japanse surgeon. He studied medicine in America. He was a very kind and sympathetic man, a reputed surgeon and a true humanitarian.

Sadao shared a very serious relationship with his father. His father was very enthusiastic concerning Sadao’s education. He sent Sadao to America at the age of twenty-two to study surgery and medicine. Sadao came back to Japan at thirty after the completion of his study.

He married Hana and lived a very happy married life. They loved each other deeply.

Dr. Sadao was a fine doctor and kind-hearted humanitarian. It is known from the fact that one day he and his wife Hana saw a wounded soldier lying unconscious on the sea-shore.  First, they thought of putting the man back into the sea. But their conscience forbade them to do so.

In spite of the fact that the wounded soldier was an American, they lifted him and carried him to their house. There, Sadao gave good treatment to the moribund soldier and saved his life, in spite of the menace he faced from his native men. At last, he set him free and told the general that the prisoner had escaped and he was ready to meet the consequence for what he did.

Thus we see that Dr. Sadao was a fine doctor and a kind-hearted humanitarian to the truest sense.

Q.2. Why and how did Dr. Sadao help the prisoner of war to escape? Do you find him guilty of harbouring an enemy?

Ans: Dr. Sadao was a fine doctor and kind-hearted humanitarian. One night,  he and his wife Hana saw a wounded soldier (prisoner of war) laying unconscious on the sea-shore.  First, they thought of putting the man back into the sea. But their conscience forbade them to do so. In spite of the fact that the wounded soldier was an American, they lifted him and carried him to their home. There, Sadao gave good treatment to the moribund soldier and saved his life, in spite of the menace he faced from his native men.

When the wounded American soldier was healed, Dr. Sadao arranged a boat for him and asked him to reach a nearby island from where he could seek the help of a Korean boat to escape. He provided him with some food, some bottles of water and two quilts in the boat. He gave him a flashlight and asked him to give a signal with it in case he ran out of food. He was also dressed in a Japanese outfit and his blonde head was covered with a black cloth. Thus, Dr. Sadao helped the prisoner of war to escape.

Dr. Sadao is not guilty of harbouring an enemy.  It is a general truth that the countries at war are considered to be enemies to each other. Dr. Sadao was in confusion to make his choice between his role as an individual and as a Japanese.  But it was his humanitarian feeling to save the life of an American prisoner of war. In doing so, he overpowered his narrow sense of nationality and proved himself as a true human.

Q.3. Dr. Sadao was compelled by his duty as a doctor to save a dying enemy. What made Hana sympathise with the American sailor in spite of open defiance from the servants? How do you justify the behaviour of the old General? Was it human consideration or lack of national loyalty or dereliction of duty? 

Ans: Hana was a kind-hearted woman. She loved her husband dearly and she was committed to supporting her husband. She displayed her strength of character standing by her husband to save the life of the moribund American prisoner of war. In doing so, she faced open defiance from the servants. But she did not care about the defiance and played her role as a human. 

The behaviour of the old General invoked criticism. He was a Japanese General. While he heard about the prisoner of war, he called for Dr. Sadao and said to him that as a Japanese Dr Sadao had done the wrong in harbouring an enemy but as a doctor, he has done his role. But to scot-free of this accusation, the General promised him to send some of his private assassins to his home to kill the enemy.  But he did keep his promise. As a Japanese General, his duty was to arrest the war-prisoner at once. But he did not do that. So we can accuse him of dereliction of duty.  0 0 0

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

.

MAGH BIHU/MAGHAR DUMAHI

-Dr. Praphulla Dutt Goswami

SELECT  QUESTION-ANSWERS 

A.  Short Answer Type Question ( Each bearing 2 Marks)

Q.1. What is the delicacy of ‘Sunga-pitha’ prepared? H.S. ’19

Ans: The delicacy of ‘Sunga-pitha’ is prepared with pithaguri adding some coconut jellies to it.

Q.2. Name the different forms of Bihu? Why is Magh Bihu known as ‘Maghar  Domahi’ in Lower Assam?

Ans: There are different forms of Bihu as Bohag Bihu, Kati Bihu and Magh Bihu. Magh Bihu is the post-harvest winter festival of Assam. It is also known as ‘Maghar Domahi’ in Lower Assam. ‘Dohami’ refers to the juncture of two months. In Lower Assam, the Dumahi (juncture of Puh and Magh) is celebrated with enthusiasm. So Magh Bihu is known as ‘Maghar Dohami’.

Q.3. What is the meaning of ‘Domahi’? What do people usually have for lunch on that day? H. S. ’19

Ans: ‘Domahi’ refers to the juncture of two months. In Lower Assam, the Dumahi (juncture of Puh and Magh) is celebrated with enthusiasm. On this day people usually have jalpan with various kind of pithas, laddos, chira, muri and soon.

Q.4. What do you mean by ‘Meji? How is it different from a ‘Bhelaghar’? H. S. ’19

Ans: ‘Meji’ is a temple-like structure built by the young boys in the fields on the occasion of Magh Bihu. It is made with bamboo, dried banana leaves and hay.

‘Meji’ is different from ‘Bhelaghar’ in this respect that Meji is temple-like and Bhelaghar is hut-like.

B.  Long  Answer Type Questions. (Each bearing 7 Marks)

Q.1. Describe the different kinds of sports and martial games associated with Magh Bihu. How did the young people in earlier times prepare themselves participating in the martial arts?

or

What are the different sports held on the occasion of Magh Bihu or Maghar Domahi? H. S.’20

Ans: Magh Bihu is the Bihu of much fun and enjoyment. During this Bihu some sports like racing, wrestling, jumping, buffalo fighting, egg fighting etc. are held with enthusiasm.

Along with these sports some martial games like swordplay, javeling throwing etc. were also popular during the Magh Bihu in the earlier times.

The young people in the earlier times gathered weeks ahead of the festival and made camps on dry river beds to practise those martial games. They exercised themselves in the arts with much interest which in turn were proved necessary in warfare. 

Q.2. Kati Bihu, according to the author, cannot be called a festival as such. How is Kati Bihu celebrated in Assam?

Ans: Among the three Bihus of Assam, the Kati Bihu is something different from the rest.  It is held in the Autumn season as a festival of little significance.  In this season, the food stores of the peasant families become almost empty and so the peasant-folk seem to be less enthusiastic in celebrating the Kati Bihu. 

The Kati Bihu is celebrated on the last day of the month of Kati. On the day, women and children put earthen lamp at the foot of the Tulsi plant and sing hymns. The Tulsi plant is considered to be the symbol of Vrinda, one of the devotees of Lord Krishna.  By means of singing songs, the folk ask Tulsi Mother about the whereabouts of Lord Krishna.

There is another aspect of the Kati Bihu which is related to the peasants. They plant a small bamboo in the field and lights an earthen lamp at its foot and sing certain mantras to protect the paddy fROm the invading pests. Some farmers light the ‘akash banti’ hanging from a tall bamboo.

Q.3. The Uruka happens to be an important aspect of Magh Bihu. Why?

or

Give an elaborate account of the celebration associated with Uruka, the important part of Magh Bihu. H. S. ’20

Ans: Mag Bihu is a festival of much fun and enjoyment. The celebration of this Bihu begins on the last day of the month of Puh and continues to the seventh day of the month of Magh. 

The Magh Bihu begins with the celebration of ‘Uruka’ which falls on the last day of the month of Puh. On this day, the womenfolk get ready for the next days with their preparations like pitha, lado, chira, curd, muri and some other delicacies. Usually, Uruka is not a one-day affair, because preparation for those items of delicacies is done a few days ahead.  They arrange fuel, catch fishes from ponds and some people collect meat to be taken as food for the next days. During the Magh Bihu people prostate on the feet of the elders asking for bliss. Gamosas are presented to the gurus and elderly persons. The relatives are invited to the houses and they are feed with the delicacies prepared on the day of Uruka. 

So Uruka happens to be an important aspect of Magh Bihu. 0 0 0

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

 

ON THE FACE OF IT

-Susan Hill

TEXTUAL QUESTION-ANSWERS 

A. Read and Find Out (Each bearing 2 Marks)

Q. 1. Who is Mr. Lamb? How does Derry get into his garden?

Ans: Mr. Lamb is an old man who lives alone in a big house with a garden. 

Derry climbs up the wall and gets into the garden of Mr. Lamb.

Q. 2. Do you think all this will change Denny’s attitude towards Mr. Lamb?

Ans: Mr. Lamb left a deep impression on Derry’s mind. Derry had suffered from an inferiority complex because of his burnt face. But Mr. Lamb motivates him to see life positively.

Mr. Lamb’s impact on Derry changed his attitude for which Derry came back to Lamb in spite of his mother’s prevention.

A. Reading with Insight (Each bearing 7 Marks)

Q. 1. What is it that draws Derry towards Mr. Lamb in spite of himself?

Ans: Derry had a burnt face for which he was suffering from inferiority complex. This made him lonely and withdrawn. He avoided the company of people. He could not bear the pitiable remarks made by people on him. He hated them. One day he got into the garden of Mr. Lamb in search of loneliness. There he met Mr. lamb, the owner of the garden. It was a meeting of two minds with totally opposite views. Derry was withdrawn and Mr. Lamb was social. He was ready to welcome anyone who came to him. Mr. Lamb had a tin leg because he lost one of his legs in the war. Children teased him by calling ‘Lamely Lamb’.

Derry took time to open his mouth. Mr. Lamb accepted life as it came. He was always cheerful and tried to comfort others. There in the garden, they had exchanged views towards life. Eventually, Mr. Lamb could fall a deep impression on Derry’s mind. He showed the Derry the ways of the world and motivated him to look at things positively. He suggested to Derry that he should stop caring what others said about his burnt face.

Mr. Lamb taught him the lesson of positive thinking and it drew Derry towards him.

Q. 2. In which section of the play does Mr. Lamb display signs of loneliness and disappointment? What are the ways in which Mr. Lamb tries to overcome those feelings?

Ans: In one scene of the play Mr. Lamb shows the signs of loneliness and disappointment and  he has tried to overcome the signs of loneliness and disappointment in the following ways:

Mr. Lamb has a tin leg as he lost one in the war. But he never suffered from any disappointment. He tried to overcome it by means of his attitude towards life. He had built a positive outlook and he was motivated by it.

His positive outlook towards life was revealed through his words and activities. He told Derry that he was lame and the children called him by ‘Lamely Lamb’. But he never got irritated by their calling so. He liked the company of people and was always cheerful doing his own duty. He talked to all who visited his garden.

He plucked the grab apples. He climbed up the trees with his tin legs to make jelly from them. He accepted life as it came to him. He never felt sad. He always kept busy in the garden and thus he overcame loneliness and disappointment in life.

He taught Derry the lesson of positive thinking and optimist outlook towards life. He advised Derry not to care about what people would talk of him.

Q. 3. ‘The actual pain or inconvenience caused by a physical impairment is often less than the sense of alienation felt by the person with disabilities. What is the kind of behaviour that the person expects from others?

Ans: It is true that the actual pain or inconvenience caused by a physical impairment is often less than the kind of alienation felt by the person with disabilities. 

People with physical impairment often suffer from inferiority complex. Some people think of physically disabled people to be unlucky. They hardly show any love towards the disabled persons. What they exhibit is sympathy mixed with antipathy. Therefore a disabled person becomes withdrawn and lonely. But the feeling of loneliness and inferiority complex is more fatal than physical impairment. In the play ‘On the Face of It’, we see that Derry is the victim of loneliness and the sense of inferiority complex because of his burnt face. He has no friends as he remains aloof from society. He thinks that with a burnt face he is not fit to be a part of society. He feels that no one will love and kiss him except his mother. This sense stands fatal to him. 

On the other hand, Mr. Lamb who has a tin leg, is free from such feelings for which he is cheerful and active. He loves life and keeps a positive outlook towards life. He falls a deep impression on the mind of Derry for which Derry’s outlook towards life seems to be changing.

Thus we see that the above statement is true.

Q. 4. Will Derry get back to his old seclusion or will Mr. Lamb’s brief association effect a change in the kind of life he will lead in the future?

Ans: Everything we feel or the way we behave is the expression of our outlook towards life.  Derry had a negative attitude toward life before he met Mr. Lamb. He kept himself shut up in his own self. His burnt face made him lonely and depressed. He avoided the company of people. When people threw uncharitable remark on him, he became offended  and thus he developed a hatred for people.

But Derry, after meeting Mr. Lamb, appreciated that he should not give ear to the comments of others. He had a burnt face, but besides, he had everything to rise in life like others. Mr. Lmab is also a physically disabled man. He lost one of his legs in the war. But his attitude towards life is positive for which he always feels happy and comfortable. He derives pleasure from meeting people and doing his duty with joy. He likes flowers, fruits and weeds equally.

Mr. Lamb had fallen a deep impression on Derry’s mind which turned him to look things with a positive attitude. In brief, to say, Mr. Lamb changes the life course of Derry. 

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

ADDITIONAL QUESTION-ANSWER

A.  Short Answer type Questions. (Each bearing 2 Marks)

Q.1. Why did Derry go back to Mr. Lamb in the end?

Ans: Derry gets back to Mr. Lamb in the end because he felt that he wanted to sit, look and listen to the bees singing and Mr. Lamb talking. Moreover, he felt that if he did not go back to Mr. Lamb then he would never go anywhere in the world again.

Q.2. How does Mr. Lamb find everything interesting?

Ans: Mr. Lmab was an old man with a positive outlook. In spite of being a lame person, he was never sad. He made his life interesting by his positive outlooks and activities. He plucked the apples. He climbed up the trees with his tin leg to make jelly from them. He accepted life as it came to him.

Q.3. Why aren’t there any curtain at the windows of Mr. Lamb’s house?

Ans: There was not any curtain at the windows of Mr. Lamb’s house because he was not fond of curtains. He felt that by putting curtains at the windows, he would shut things out and shut things in which he did not want. Moreover, he liked the light and the sound of the wind.

Q.4. Why and how did Derry enter Mr. Lamb’s garden?

Ans: Derry entered Mr. Lamb’s garden by walking slowly and cautiously through the long grass and round a screen of bushes and finally by climbing over the garden wall.

Q. 4. How did Mr. Lamb try to give courage and confidence to Derry? H. S. ’20

Ans: Mr. Lamb was a man of a positive outlook. He tried to give courage and confidence to Derry by saying that a man should take life positively. He said more that we should not give ear to the comments of others. A man should derive pleasure from meeting people and doing his duty with joy.  Thus Mr. Lamb had fallen a deep impression on Derry’s mind which turned him to look at things with a positive attitude. 

B.  Long Answer Type Questions. (Each bearing 7 Marks)

Q.1. What impression do you form of Mr. Lamb? How does he look at life?

Ans: Mr. Lamb is the main character of the play ‘On the Face of It’. He has a tin leg as one was blown off in the war. But he never suffered from any disappointment. He tried to overcome it by means of his attitude towards life. He had built a positive outlook towards life and he was motivated by it.

His positive outlook towards life was revealed through both of his words and activities. He told Derry that he was lame and the children called him by ‘Lamely Lamb’. But he never got irritated by their calling so. He liked the company of people and was always cheerful doing his own duty. He talked to all who visited his garden.

He plucked the apples. He climbed up the trees with his tin leg to make jelly from them. He accepted life as it came to him. He never felt sad. He was sociable and liked talking to people. He always kept busy in the garden and thus he overcame loneliness and disappointment in life.

He taught Derry the lesson of positive thinking and optimist outlook towards life. He advised Derry not to care about what people would talk of him. 0 0 0

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

 

MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD

-Zitkala Sa and Bama

TEXTUAL QUESTION-ANSWERS 

A. Reading with Insight (Each bearing 7 Marks)

Q. 1. The two accounts that you read above are based in two distant cultures. What is the commonality of theme found in both of them?

or

Compare and contrast the stories of Zitkala-Sa and Bama. H. S. ’20

Ans: ‘Memories of Childhood’ bears two biographical episodes of two women, one is of an American native woman and the other is of Indian Tamil Dalit woman. Both the women belong to two distinct cultures but the themes of the two accounts are almost the same and that is caste discrimination.

The native American woman named Zitkala-Sa portrays in her account how she became a victim of class distinction. The Americans treated the natives with a sense of superiority over them.  They tried to impose their cultural tradition and whim on the ways of others. They made the children behave after their custom and thus hurt the feelings of dignity and respect of the native Americans.  The narrator’s hair was cut off without showing any regard to her feeling. She was forced to sit on a chair, tied her with it and her long hair was cut. She rebelled until she got overpowered. There was none to comfort her.

In the same way, another girl by the name of Bama experienced caste discrimination in Indian society. One day while returning from school, she saw a person carrying a packet of food on a string so that he can not touch that. The girl felt it disgusting. She rebelled and set to study better to show that caste did not determine the ability of a person.

Thus both the women in their childhood were the victims of social injustice. 

Q. 2. It may take a long time for oppression to be resisted, but the seeds of rebellion are sowed early in life. Do you agree that injustice in any form can’t escape being noticed even by children?

Ans: The two biographical episodes in the  ‘Memories of Childhood’ deal with the theme of social injustice. One is of American society and the other is of Indian society.

The Americans think that their culture and tradition are superior to those of the natives. Hence being agitated by their vain sense of superiority, they compelled the natives to accept their ways of life. They did not consider the feelings of the native Americans. They made the narrator’s hair cut short against her protest.

In the other incident, the custom of untouchability prevailed in Indian society comes to light. One day the narrator Bama happened to notice that a Dalit person was carrying a pack of food on a string so that he could not touch it. She felt it disgusting and rebelled. 

Both the narrators were small girls. Yet they happened to face the cruelty done to the lower or poorer class of people in society by the other people. The two episodes show us that injustice of any kind can’t escape being noticed even by the children.

Q. 3. Bama’s experience is that of a victim of the caste system. What kind of discrimination does Zitkala Sa’s experience depict? What are their responses to their respective situations?

Ans: ‘Memories of Childhood’ bears two biographical episodes of two women, one is of an American native woman and the other is of an Indian Tamil Dalit woman. Both the women belong to two distinct cultures but the theme of the two accounts are almost the same and that is caste discrimination.

The native American woman named Zitkala Sa portrays in her account how she became a victim of class distinction. The Americans treated the natives with a sense of superiority over them.  They tried to impose their cultural tradition and whim on the ways of others. They made the children behave after their custom and thus hurt the feelings of dignity and respect of the native Americans.  The narrator’s hair was cut off without showing any regard to her feeling. She was forced to sit on a chair, tied her with it and her long hair was cut off. She rebelled until she got overpowered. There was none to comfort her.

In the same way, another girl by the name of Bama experienced caste discrimination in Indian society. One day while returning from school, she saw a person carrying a packet of food on a string so that he could not touch it. The girl felt it disgusting. She rebelled and set to study better to show that caste did not determine the ability of a person.

Thus both the women in their childhood experienced social injustice because of class discrimination. 

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

ADDITIONAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

A. Short Answer type Questions. (Each bearing 2 Marks)

Q.1. How did Zitkala Sa feel uncomfortable in the dining room?

Ans: The narrator Zitkala-Sa felt uneasy. When the bell rang, she pulled out the chair and sat down. But other did not do that. She felt confused. When the bell rang for the second time, then all were seated. The narrator noticed that she was being watched keenly by a pale woman. So she felt quite uncomfortable in the dining room.

Q.2. How did Zitkala-Sa hide herself? Did she succeed?

Ans: Zitkala-Sa went to a large room and hid under a bed. But her effort proved abortive. The people looked under the bed and found her out from her hiding place. Then she was pulled along the stairs and tied her fast with a chair and with force shingled her long hair.

Q.3. What is the message of the first episode, ‘The Cutting of My Long Hair’?

Ans: The episode portrays the racial discrimination in American society. The White people in America tried to impose their own tradition and lifestyle upon the native Americans. They did not think that the natives were very contrary to adopt a new custom imposed upon them by force. It hurt their feeling and dignity.

Q.4. Why was Annan not amused by Bama’s story?

Ans: When Bama told the story of a Dalit person carrying a pack of food on a string which was a subject of fun to little Bama, could not amuse Annan. The irony here is that Annan was well acquainted with the system of untouchability prevailed in the society.

Q.5. What did Annan say about the community to Bama the narrator?

or

How did Annan explain the elder man’s action to Bama? H. S. ’20

Ans: Annan told Bama that they belonged to a ‘low caste’. The people of this community were treated with disgust and hatred by the people of high cates. Thus they had been being treated badly. He said more that when the members of this low caste would be able to get high education, then people would come to them of their own accord and only then the attitude of people towards the low caste might change. 

Q. 6. Why did it take Bama to reach home in 30 minutes instead of 10 minutes? H. S. ’20

Ans: One day Bama, while coming back home from school,  happened to notice that a Dalit person was carrying a pack of food on a string so that he could not touch it. After seeing this, she became sad and thoughtful.  So it TOOK Bama to reach home in 30 minutes instead of 10 minutes.

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Suppl Reader

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Other Ready Guides for H S 2nd Yr by Growhills Publishing:

  • Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose
  • Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Poetry
  • Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Rapid Reader (Suppl Reader)
  • Ready Guide H S English Grammar & Composition 

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