Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

For 

Coming H. S. Final Exam 

 

  

By

Growhills Writers’ Board

 

  

 

Growhills Publishing

Barpeta, Assam

Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose, For Coming H. S. Final  Examination by Growhills Writers’ Board,  Published by Growhills Publishing, Barpeta (Assam)

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 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

SYLLABUS

H.S. 2nd Year English 

Marks: 100

Section A: Reading Skills (Unseen Passage)– Marks: 10

Section -B: Advanced Writing Skills– Marks: 25

Section -C: Grammar–Marks: 20

Section -D: Text Books–Marks: 45

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

CONTENTS

PROSE

1. The Last Lesson -By Alphonse Daudet

2. Lost Spring – By Anees Jung

3. Indigo – By Louis Fisher

4. Going Places -By A. R. Barton

5. Memoirs of Sota Sahib – By John Rawntree 

POETRY

1.  My Mother at Sixty  Six – By Kamala Das

2. Keeping Quiet -By Pablo Neruda 

3. A Thing of Beauty- By John Keats 

4. A Roadside Stand – By Robert Frost

SUPPLEMENTARY READER

(VISTAS)

1. The Tiger King – By Kalki

2. Journey to the End of the Earth  -By Tishani Doshi

3. On the Face of It -By Susan Hill

`4. Memoirs of Childhood  -By Zitkala-Sa and Bama

5. The Enemy – By Pearl S. Buck 

6. Magh Bihu or Maghar Domahi -By Prafulla Dutt Goswami.

READING SKILL

1. UNSEEN PASSAGE COMPREHENSION

ADVANCED WRITING SKILL

Advertisement, Notice, Designing or Drafting, Posters, Invitation and Replies, Report Writing, Business Letter, Letter to Editors, Application for Job/

GRAMMAR

Solution of H. S. Final Exams’ Questions on Grammar from 2001 onwardsprose 

………………………………..

READY GUIDE H S 2ND YR ENGLISH ROSE

(FLAMINGO)

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

THE LAST LESSON

-Alphonse Daudet

TEXTUAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

THINK AS YOU READ-I

Q.1. What was Franz expected to be prepared with for school that day?  H.S. ’15

Ans: Franz was expected to be prepared with Particilples for school that day. But little Franz did not read them at all.

Q.2.What did Franz notice that was unusual about the school that day? H.S. ’13, 17

or 

Give a detailed account of the scene in the classroom on the day of the last lesson. H.S. ’15

Ans: Little Franz noticed some unusual things at the school that day. He noticed that the school was as quiet as a Sunday morning. The students were sitting quietly on their seats. The teacher M. Hamel wore some special dress. In addition to that, some elder village people had come to the school and were sitting at the backbenches like the students. Among them, there were old Hauser, former Mayor, former Postmaster and several others.

Q.3.What had been put up on the bulletin-board?

Ans: The Governemnt orders and important news were put up on the bulletin-board. For the last two years such bad news as lost battles, the draft, the order of the commanding officers were put up on the bulletin- board. The latest news was about introducing German language instead of French in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine.

THINK AS YOU READ-II

Q.1. What change did the order from Berlin cause in school that day?

Ans: The order that came from Berlin was that only German, not French, would be taught in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine. This order caused great trouble in the school that day. M. Hamel was disappointed. The village people and even the students were sorry and upset.

Q.2. How did Franz’s feelings about M. Hamel and school change?

Ans: On the day of the last lesson when the teacher M. Hamel had announced that in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine only German, instead of French would be taught, then Franz’s feeling changed about  M. Hamel and school. Since that moment Franz developed a strong fascination for his language and his school. He began to feel his French books to be his old friends. And about M. Hamel he developed a strong respect and forgot all about the teacher’s cranky behaviour.

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

ADDITIONAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

Q.1. What is the name of the blacksmith mentioned in ‘The Last Lesson’? H.S. ’18

Ans: The name of the blacksmith mentioned in ‘The Last Lesson’ is Wachter.

Q.2. What did Franz think for a moment?

Ans: Franz thought for a moment to run away from home and spending the day out of doors without going to school.

Q.3. What is the name of the river mentioned in ‘The Last Lesson’?  H.S. ’19

Ans: The name of the river mentioned in ‘The Last Lesson’ is Saar.

Q.4. What would Franz love to do on that sunny morning instead of going to school? H.S. ’19

Ans: Instead of going to school, little Franz would like to enjoy the bright day, the chirping of the birds and drill of the Prussian soldiers that day.

Q.5. What according to M. Hamel is the great trouble with Alsace?  H.S. ’18, ’20

Ans: The great trouble with Alsace was that it was conquered by the Germans and they imposed German culture and language on the people of that province. But the people did not like them.

Q.6. ‘Will they make them sing in German, even the pigeons’? What does this sentence suggest? H.S. ’18

Ans: After conquering  Alsace and Lorraine-  two provinces of France, the shrewd German imposed the German language on the people of that provinces. Resultantly the French people had to lose their mother tongue. It was a pathetic matter for the people of France. When the teacher M. Hamel announced, after an order from Berlin, that only German, not French language would be taught in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine then the little Franz became so sorry and thought that the shrewd Germans might impose German language on the pigeons. It suggests Franz’s deep regret and sorrow for losing their motherland.

Q.7. What was written in the new copies brought by M. Hamel for the students in a beautiful round hand? H. S. ’17

Ans: The two words ‘France, Alsace’ were written in the new copies brought by M. Hamel for the students in a beautiful round hand.

Q.8. What did M. Hamel write at the end of the class? 

Ans: At the end of the class the teacher M. Hamel took a piece of chalk in his hand and wrote ‘Vive La France’ (Long Live France) on the blackboard. 

Q.9. Who is the author of the short story ‘The Last Lesson’?

Ans: Alphonse Daudet is the author of the short story ‘The Last Lesson’.

Q.10. ‘I started for school very late that morning. Who is the ‘I’ here?     H.S. ’14

Ans: Here ‘I’ refers to Franz, a little student. 

Q.11. How long did the Teacher M. Hamel teach in the school?

Ans: The teacher M. Hamel taught in the school for forty years.

Q.12. What did M. Hamel pronounce to the students, mounting from his chair?

Ans: M. Hamel, mounting from his chair, pronounced to this students that it was the last day of his teaching in the school. He said that an order had come from Berlin that only German would be taught in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine. The new master would come the following day. He expected that the students would be very attentive as it was his last day at the school.

Q.13. What did M. Hamel do when he went for fishing?

Ans: M. Hamel just gave a holiday to the students when he went for fishing

Q.14. What did M. Hamel write on the black-board just before the school was dismissed on the day of the last lesson? What did they mean? H.S. ’19

Ans: As the church-bell struck twelve, M. Hamel took a piece of chalk in his hand and bearing it with all his might, wrote ‘Vive La France’ on the blackboard. The phrase means, ‘Long Live France!’

Q.15. What did M. Hamel want to give his students before leaving the school?

Ans: M. Hamel wanted to put all the knowledge that he knew into the head of the students at one stroke.

Q.16. Why did Franz want to spend his day out of doors that day? H.S. ’12

Ans: That day Franz started for school very late and was in great dread of getting  M. Hamel’s scolding because the teacher said that he would question the students on Participles but he did not read about them. So to get rid of the scolding from the teacher, he wanted to spend the day out of doors that day.

Q.17. Usually, how was the atmosphere of the school when it began.

Ans: Usually when the school began, there was a great bustle which could be heard out in the street. The bustle was made of the sound of the opening and closing of desks, the lesson repeated by the students in unison and the teacher’s great ruler rapping on the table.

Q.18. What does the phrase ‘Vive La France’ mean?

Ans: The phrase ‘Vive La France’ means ‘long live France’.

Q.19. Why was the lesson called ‘The Last Lesson’?

Ans: It was called ‘The Last lesson’ because an order had come from Berlin that only German, not French, would be taught in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine from the next day. 

Q.20. What was M. Hamel’s opinion (views) on the French Language? H.S. ’13,’16

Ans: M. Hamel’s opinion on the French language was that it was the most clear, most beautiful and most logical language of the world.

Q.21. Why did Wachter, the blacksmith, tell Franz that he would reach school in ‘Plenty of time’? H.S. ’20

Ans: Wachter, the blacksmith told Franz that he would reach school in plenty of time because Franz was in a hurry to reach school. He even did not have any interest to read the news of the bulletin board.  Seeing this, Wachter told him so.  

Q.21. Who were responsible for the students’ inability to read and write their own language correctly?

or

How does M. Hamel make the people realize how they, the students and he have been responsible for not learning their language well? H. S. ’20

Ans: According to M. Hamel the following people  were responsible for the students’ inability to read and write their language correctly as:

First, the parents of the students were not anxious enough to have their children learn more. They preferred their children to work on the farm or in the mills to earn some money.

Secondly, the teacher himself was responsible because he just gave a holiday when he went for fishing and he sometimes put the students to water his flower plants instead of making them learn their lessons.

Q.22. Draw a character sketch of M.Hamel as it is shown in ‘The Last Lesson’.

Ans: M. Hamel was a school teacher at a school in the province of Alsace. The story writer has portrayed him fully in the story. He is shown as a strict disciplinarian. He often punished and rebuked the students. The students were also afraid of his cranky nature. But sometimes he himself broke the school discipline as he gave a holiday to the students when he went for fishing. Sometimes he put the students to water his garden instead of making them learn their lesson. But above all, he was a very good teacher and rendered his faithful service for forty years in the school. He was very patriotic also. He felt sorry for losing their motherland in the hand of the Germans. He hoped that one day they would get freedom. As his sign of patriotism, he wrote ‘Vive La France’ on the Blackboard as large as he could. 0 0 0

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

THE LOST SPRING

-Anees Jung

TEXTUAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

THINK AS YOU READ-I

Q.1. What is Saheb looking for in the garbage dumps? Where is he and where has he come from? H.S. ’14

Ans: Saheb is looking for stray  coins in the garbage dumps.

He is now in Seemapuri near Delhi. He has come from Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Q.2. What explanation does the author offer for the children not wearing footwear? H.S. ’15

Ans: The explanation that the author offers is that the children walk barefooted because of their perpetual state of poverty.

Q.3. Is Saheb happy working at the tea-stall? Explain. H.S. ’12, ’20

Ans: Saheb is not happy working at the tea-stall because there he has lost his freedom. Moreover, he has to carry a canister which is heavier than the plastic bags that he used to carry about while he worked as a rag-picker.

THINK AS YOU READ-II

Q.1. What makes the city of Firozabad famous? H.S. ’15

Ans: Firozabad is famous for bangle making industries. From generation to generation the people of Firozabad are engaged in making bangles for Indian women.

Q.2. Mention the hazards in the glass bangle industries.

Ans: Glass bangle industries are full of hazards. The people of Firozabad have to work all day long in the confined dark dingy cell of their house making bangles. Consequently, they lose their eyesight before they are old.

Q.3. How is Mukesh’s attitude to his situation different from that of his family?

Ans: Mukesh belongs to a family of bangle makers. But he has no fascination for the work of bangle making. He wishes to be a motor mechanic.

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

ADDITIONAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

Q.1. Where is the original home of Saheb? H. S.’20

or

Where does Saheb originally hail from? H.S. ’19

Ans: The original home of Saheb is in Dhaka, Bangladesh. 

Q.2. Who is the author of the essay ‘Lost Spring’?

Ans: The author of the essay ‘Lost Spring’ is Anees Jung.

Q.3. Who is Saheb? What is the meaning of his name?

Ans: Saheb is a rag-picker belonging to a bangle making family living in Firozabad.

The full name of Saheb is ‘Saheb-e-Alom’ which means ‘Lord of the Universe’.

Q.4. Why do the young inhabitants of Firozabad end up losing their eye-sight? H. S. ’16

Ans: The people of Firozabad have to work all day long in the confined dark dingy cell of their house making bangles. Consequently, they lose their eyesight before they are old.

Q.5. What does garbage mean for the elders of Seemapuri? H. S. ’17

Ans: For the elders, garbage is a means of survival. It is their daily bread.

Q.6. Where does Mukesh live? H. S. ’17

Ans: Mukesh live in Firozabad, near Seemapuri.

Q.7. Garbage to them is gold’. Why does the author say so about the rag-pickers? H.S. ’13

Ans: The author says metaphorically that the garbage is gold for the rag-pickers. Because they find some silver coins in the heaps of garbage.  For the elders, the garbage is a means of their survival. They earn their daily bread by picking the garbage and selling them in the market. 

Q.8. Whom does Saheb observe standing at the fenced gate of the neighbourhood club?

Ans: One morning, standing at the fenced gate of the neighbouring club, Saheb observed two young men dressed in white playing tennis.

Q.9. Where is Seemapuri?

Ans: Seemapuri is in the outskirt of Delhi.

Q.10. What is Mukesh’s dream? 

Ans: Mukesh’s dream is to become a motor mechanic.

Q. 11. What does Mukesh want to be? H.S. ’15, 20

Ans: Mukesh wants to be a motor mechanic.

Q.12. Why is Mukesh proud to take the author to his home?

Ans: Mukesh is proud of taking the author to his home because it was rebuilt.

Q.13. Who is in-charge of Mukesh’s household?

Ans: Savita, the daughter in law of the house is in charge of the household.

Q.14. Why is not Saheb wearing chappals?

Ans: Saheb is not wearing chappals because his mother did not allow him to wear them.

Q.15. What does Saheb look for in the garbage dumps? H.S. ’16

Ans: Saheb looks for (gold) coins in the garbage dumps.

Q.16. Where does Saheb come from?

Ans: Saheb came from Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Q.17. Why have Saheb and his family migrated to Seemapuri? H. S. ’17

Ans: Saheb and his family migrated to Seemapuri from Dhaka in search of livelihood. In Dhaka, they had to live under hardship as the storm swept away their homes and green fields. 

Q.18. Why did the man from Udipi pray for at the temple as a young boy?

Ans: The man from Udipi prayed at the temple for a pair of shoes.

Q.19. What is the irony inherent in Saheb’s full name?

Ans: The full name of Saheb is ‘Saheb-e-Alom” which means  ‘Lord of the Universe’. But the irony inherent in the name is that Saheb does not know the meaning of his name. Even if he knew,  he could hardly believe it because in reality, he lived under the poverty line.

Q.20. Why does not Mukesh ever dream of flying a plane?

Ans: Mukesh does not ever dream of flying a plane because few planes fly over the sky of Seemapuri. Instead, he dreams of becoming a motor driver because he sees cars running in the street every day.

Q.21. What was the promise made by Anees Jung to Saheb? H. S. ’17

Ans: The promise made by Anees Jung to Saheb is that he would open a school there at Seemapuri.

Q.22. What kinds of bangles are made in Firozabad?

Ans: In Firozabad every kind of bangles are made for the Indian women. They made the bangles of different colours as – pink, red, blue, purple, sunny gold, paddy green etc.

Q.23. Why does Mukesh’s grandmother believe that a ‘god-given lineage’ can never be broken?

Ans: Mukesh’s grandmother saw her husband go blind with the dust from polishing the glass of bangles. She believed it was his ‘karma’ (destiny). She said so because in the caste of bangle makers they could never break down ‘god-given lineage’. They could never think of other livelihoods except bangle making.

Q.24. ‘Listening to them, I see two distinct worlds.’ What are two distinct worlds? H.S. ’18

Ans: The first of the two distinct worlds seen by the author is the perpetual wave of poverty suffered by the bangles makers and the second is the vicious circle of the sahukars, the middlemen, the policemen, the keepers of laws and the politicians.

Q.25. What does the author of ‘Lost Spring’ find Saheb doing every morning? H.S. ’15

Ans: The author of ‘Lost Spring’ finds Saheb searching for gold (coins) in the garbage dumps every morning.

Q.26. Give a brief description of Seemapuri? H.S. ’20

Ans: Seemapuri is in the outskirts of Delhi. About ten thousand ragpickers live there. It is full of bangle industries. Most people living there have come form Bangladesh, They live under the poverty line.

Q.27. Describe the miserable plight of the people of Firozabad. H.S. ’17

Ans: Firozabad is famous for its bangle industry.  Every member of every family living in Firozabad is involved in this business. The children sit with their parents weilding pieces of coloured glasses into circles of bangles. Their eyes become more adjusted to the dark than to the light. Therefore the bangle makers lose their eyesight before they become old.

The bangle makers of Firozabad are encircled by two different circles of poverty and exploitation. They believed that they are born into the caste of bangle makers and they cannot break the ‘god-given’ lineage. But doing it they are caught in a perpetual state of poverty. They do not even have enough to eat. Due to poverty, they can neither send their children to school nor can they build a proper house to live in.

Besides this, for want of leadership among them, they cannot dream of a better life. If the bangle makers organise themselves into cooperatives, they become the victims of police and middlemen.

Thus the bangle makers of Firozabad are forced into the spiral of poverty, apathy, greed and injustice. 

Q.28. ‘Describe the bangle makers of Firozabad. How does the vicious circle of the Sahukars, the middlemen never allow them to come out o their poverty?  H.S. ’18

Ans: The author finds two distinct worlds in Seemapuri: one is the perpetual wave of poverty suffered by the bangles makers and the second is the vicious circle of the sahukars, the middlemen, the policemen, the keepers of laws and the politicians.

The bangle makers of Firozabad are engaged in bangle making works from generation to generation. They are under the sway of Sahukars, middlemen, politicians etc. who  don’t allow them to come out of their poverty. They can not organize themselves into cooperatives for fear of the police and the middlemen. They are always caught in their vicious circle. They exploit them so much that the bangle makers cannot find or think of an alternative of their work. So they cannot come out of their poverty and are compelled to live under poverty.

Q.29.  Write briefly on the hazard of working in the glass bangles industry. H.S. ’20

Ans: Firozabad is famous for bangle making industries. From generation to generation the people of Firozabad are engaged in making bangles for Indian women.

Glass bangle industries are full of hazards. The people of Firozabad have to work all day long in the confined dark dingy cell of their house making bangles for Indian women. Consequently, they lose their eyesight before they are old. They live poverty line without having a proper facility of life. 

The author finds two distinct worlds in Seemapuri: one is the perpetual wave of poverty suffered by the bangles makers and the second is the vicious circle of the sahukars, the middlemen, the policemen, the keepers of laws and the politicians. 0 0 0

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

INDIGO

-Louis Fischer

TEXTUAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

THINK AS YOU READ-I

Q.1. Strikeout what is not true in the following:

(a) Rajkumar Shukla was

(i) a sharecropper.

(ii) a politician.

(iii) delegate

(iv) a landlord

Ans: (iv) landlord. 

(b) Rajkumar Shukla was:

(i) poor

(ii) physically strong

(iii) illiterate

Ans: (iii) physically strong.

Q.2. Why is Rajkumar Shukla described as being resolute?

Ans: Rajkumar Shukla wanted to take Gandhi to Champaran for the cause of the poor peasants. But Gandhi had an engagement to go to many places. But Rajkumar Shukla was determined to take Gandhi anyway. So he followed Gandhi wherever Gandhi went. He waited till Gandhi was free. So Rajkumar was described as resolute.

Q.3.Why do you think the servants thought Gandhi to be another peasant?

Ans: In Patna, Shukla led Gandhi to the house of a lawyer named Rajendra Prasad. The servants knew Shukla to be a poor peasant of Champaran. He often troubled Rajendra Prasad to take up the case of the indigo share-croppers. So the servants of the household of Rajendra Prasad took Gandhi to be another peasant.

THINK AS YOU READ-II

Q.1. List the places that Gandhi visited between his first meeting with Shukla and his arrival at Champaran.

Ans: The places that Gandhi visited before he arrived at Champaran were- Lucknow, Calcutta, Patna, Muzaffarpur and Motihari.

Q.2. What did the peasants pay the British Landlords as rent? What did the British now want instead and why? What would be the impact of synthetic indigo on the prices of natural indigo?

Ans: The peasants had to grow indigo on 15% of their land the whole of the output of which went to the British landlords as rent.

The indigo plantation was not profitable for the peasants. So they wanted to get free of cultivating indigo. Therefore the landlords wanted compensation for freeing the peasants.

The synthetic indigo was cheaper in cost than the natural indigo.

THINK AS YOU READ-III

Q.1. The events in this part of the text illustrate Gandhi’s method of working. Can you identify some instances of this method and link them to his ideas of Satyagraha and non-violence?

Ans: Gandhi had a deep respect for legal authority. But he could defy the authorities when they violated natural justice and human values. For Gandhi voice of conscience was above any law. He was polite and friendly when he helped the British to regulate the crowd. He tried to obey the law. But he was ready to disobey for any nobler cause of his people.

All these can be linked with his ideas of Satyagraha and non-violence.

THINK AS YOU READ-IV

Q.1. Why did Gandhi agree to a settlement of 25 per cent refund to the farmers?

Ans: At first Gandhi demanded 50 per cent of the amount extorted from the peasants by the Landlords. But the landlords offered to refund only 25 per cent of the amount. Gandhi accepted the offer as he explained that this action lowered the status of the landlords in front of the peasants. Along with it, the landlords came to appreciate that the peasants had their rights also.

Q.2. How did the episode change the plight of the peasants?

Ans: The Champaran episode had changed the plight of the peasants. Previously the landlords behaved as above law. But after the episode, the peasants understood that they had rights to defy the landlords. They also learned the lesson of courage. Within a few years of this event, the British planters abandoned the lands. The peasants owned their own land. Thus the episode changed the plight of the peasants.

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

ADDITIONAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

Q.1. Who was Edward Gait? H.S. ’15

Ans: Edward Gait was the Lieutenant Governor of the province of Champaran.

Q.2. What was Gandhi’s politics interwined with? H.S. ’16

Ans: Gandhi’s politics was interwined with practical day-to-day problems of the millions.

Q.3. What did Shukla want Gandhi to do? H.S. ’15

Ans: Shukla wanted Gandhi to go to Champaran so as to take steps against the injustice done to the poor peasants by the landlords.

Q.4. Where was Champaran? H.S. ’18

Ans: Chapmaparan was in the foothills of the Himalaya, near Nepal.

Q.5. Whom did Gandhi and Shukla propose to meet at Patna? H.S. ’17

Ans: Gandhi and Shukla proposed to meet Rajendra Prasad at Patna.

Q.6. Who was Rajkumar Shukla? H.S. ’16

Ans: Rajkumar Shukla was a poor sharecropper peasants of Champaran.

Q.7. To whose house did Rajkumar take Gandhi?

Ans: Rajkumar took Gandhi to the house of Rajendra Prasad the lawyer.

Q.8. Who was the sole representative in the commission for the farmers?

Ans: Gandhi was the sole representative in the commission for the farmers.

Q.9. Why did Gandhi rebuke the lawyers?

Ans: Gandhi rebuked the lawyers because they collected heavy fees from the poor share-croppers.

Q.10. How many schools were set up initially under the patronage of Gandhi in Champaran?

Ans: Initially six schools were set up in different villages of Champaran under the patronage of Gandhi.

Q.11. Where did Louis Fischer meet Gandhi first?

Ans: Louis Fischer met Gandhi first in Sevagram Ashram.

Q.12. Who is the author of the article ‘Indigo’?

Ans: Louis Fischer is the author of the article ‘Indigo’.

Q.13. Where is Champaran? H.S. ’14, ’18

Ans: Champaran is at the foothill of the Himalayas. It is near Nepal and Bihar.

Q.14. Why did Rajkumar Shukla meet Gandhi?

Ans: Rajkumar Shukla met Gandhi to take him to Champaran for the cause of the sharecroppers.

Q.15. Where did Shukla meet Gandhi?

Ans: Shukla met Gandhi in Lucknow session of National Congress Party.

Q.16. What country had developed synthetic indigo?

Ans: Germany developed synthetic indigo.

Q.17. What was the capital of Champaran?

Ans: The capital of Champaran was Motihari.

Q.18. Where did Gandhi stay in Muzzafarpur?

Ans: In Muzzafarpur Gandhi stayed at the house of Professor Mulkani who was a teacher in a government school.

Q.19. Why was Gandhi visiting Lucknow in 1916? H.S. ’20

Ans: Gandhi was visiting Lucknow in 1916 to attend the annual convention of Indian National Congress.

Q.20. Why was Professor Mulkani’s action of offering shelter to Gandhi  ‘extraordinary? H.S. ’20

Ans: Mulkani was a professor of a Government college. During those days, no Government official could shelter a person who was against the British rule in India. But Professor Mulkani offered shelter to Gandhi. So Mulkani’s action of sheltering to Gandhi was extraordinary.

Q.20. Describe the efforts made by R. K. Shukla to persuade Gandhi to go to Champaran. H.S. ’14

Ans: Shukla first met Gandhi in the annual convention of Indian National Congress Party held in Lucknow.  There, he pleaded Gandhi to visit Champaran in favour of the share-croppers. Rajkumar Shukla wanted to take Gandhi to Champaran for the cause of the poor peasants. But Gandhi had an engagement to go to many places. Rajkumar Shukla was determined to take Gandhi anyway. So he followed Gandhi wherever Gandhi went. Shukla went with Gandhi to Cawnpore, Ahmedabad, Culcutta and waited till Gandhi was free. For many weeks he did not leave Gandhi. At last, Gandhi, being impressed by Shukla’s determination and tenacity decided to Visit Champaran.

Thus Rajkumar Shukla persuaded Gandhi to go to Champaran.

Q.21. What was the significance of the Champaran movement? (Marks- 5) 

or

“The battle of Champaran is won”, Gandhi exclaimed. Explain the context in which this was said. H.S. ’16

or

Why do you think Gandhi considered the Champaran episode to be a turning point in his life?

Ans: According to Gandhi the Champaran episode was a turning point in his life. The sharecroppers got 25% refund of the amount they paid as compensation to exempt from planting indigo in their lands. The amount of refund was less important than the fact that the landlords were humiliated for the first time.  The peasants learned that they had rights. It also brought courage to their heart to defy the government. It was the victory over civil disobedience. After this event, the British authority began to be melted down in India.

This Champaran episode was not a turning point to Gandhi only but also to the Indians as the Indians became aware of their rights and after this event, the British government also become aware of the effects of Gandhi’s Non-violence Policy. 0 0 0

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

GOING  PLACES

– A. R. Barton

TEXTUAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

THINK AS YOU READ-I

Q.1. Where was it most likely that the two girls would find work after school?

Ans: The two girls named Sophie and Jansie, most likely would find work in the biscuit factory after school.

Q.2. What were the options that Sophie was dreaming of? Why does Jansie discourage her from having such dreams?

Ans: Sophie lived in a world of fantasy. She wanted to open a beautiful boutique in the city. Then she desired to become an actress and otherwise, she wanted to be a fashion designer.

But her friend Jansie discouraged her from having such dreams because she thought that Sophie’s dream could not come into reality because of her poor family background.

THINK AS YOU READ-II

Q.1. Why did Sophie wriggle when Geoff told her father that she had met Danny Casey?

Ans: When Geoff told her father that Sophie had met Danny Casey then Sophie wriggled in fear lest her father would beat her.  Sophie knew that her father would not approve of it. 

Q.2. Does Geoff believe what Sophie says about her meeting with Danny Casey?

Ans: No, Geoff did not believe what  Sophie said about her meeting with Danny Casey. He said, “It is not true.”

Q.3. Does her father believe her story?

Ans: No, Sophie’s father did not believe her story. He knew that she was telling lies.

Q.4. How does Sophie include her brother Geoff in the fantasy of her future?

Ans: Sophie included her brother Geoff in the fantasy of her future. She dreamt of riding behind her brother Geoff to the city.

Q.5. Which country did Danny Casey play for? H.S. ’18

Ans: Danny Casey played for Ireland.

THINK AS YOU READ-III

Q.1. Why did not Sophie want Jansie to know about her story with Danny?

Ans: Sophie did not want Jansie to know her story with Danny because Sophie thought that she would spread her story to the whole neighbour.

Q.2. Did Sophie really meet Danny Casey? H.S. ’15

Ans: No, Sophie did not meet Dany Casey in real life. It was her fantasy.

Q.3. Which was the only occasion when she got to see Danny Casey in person? H.S. ’17

Ans: The only occasion when Sophie got to see Danny Casey in person was in the playground.

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

ADDITIONAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

A. Short Type Answers (Each 1 / 2 marks)

Q.1. For which team did Danny Casey play? H.S. ’18

Ans: Danny Cassey played for the United.

Q.2. To which country did Danny Casey belong?

Ans: Danny Casey belonged to Ireland.

Q.3. Who is Derek? H.S. ’19

Ans: Derek is Sophie’s younger brother.

Q.4. Who is Geoff? H.S. ’17

Ans: Geoff is Sophie’s elder brother.

Q.5. How does Danny Casey look like? 

Ans: Danny Casey was a man of short height. He had green eyes. His nose was freckled and he had exposing teeth with gaps between.

Q.6. Why did Sophie not take the autograph of Danny Casey?

Ans: Sophie did not take the autograph of Danny Casey because she had neither pen nor paper with her.

Q.7. What sort of fellow was Sophie’s father?

Ans: Sophie’s father was a stout fellow who worked hard for the family. He loved life, action and drinking. He is clumsy in habits and behaviour.

Q.8. Who is the author of the story ‘Going Places’?

Ans: A. R. Barton is the author of the story ‘Going Places’.

Q.9. Who is Sophie?

Ans: Sophie is a school-going girl. She is very fond of fantasy.

Q.10. Who is Jansie?

Ans: Jansie is a classmate of Sophie.

Q.11. Whom did Sophie like the most?

Ans: Sophie liked her brother Geoff the most.

Q.9. Why was Sophie fascinated by Danny Casey? Was it a one-sided affair? H. S. ’20

Ans: Sophie was fond of fantasy. She enjoyed the performance of Danny Casey the football player in television and was fascinated by him and fell in love with him. But the love was one-sided.

Q.10. Who are the two friends in the story ‘Going Places?

Ans: The two friends in the story, ‘Going Places’ are Sophie and Jansie.

Q.11. What did Sophie dream of? H.S. ’19

Ans: Sophie dreamt of to be an actress or an owner of a boutique.

Q.12. For whom does Sophie ask Danny Casey an autograph? H.S. ’15, ’20

Ans: Sophie asked Danny Casey an autograph for his brother Derek.

Q.13. What kind of person was Geoff? H.S. ’18

Ans: Geoff was a realistic person. He spoke little and did not share his views with others.

Q.14. What job is Geoff engaged in? Does he entertain wild and impractical dreams like his sister? H.S. ’17, ’18

or

What work does Geoff do? H. S. ’20

Ans: Geoff is engaged in an apprentice mechanic. He does not entertain wild and impractical dreams like his sister. 

Q.15. What other dream did Sophie have besides having a boutique? H.S. ’15, ’20

Ans: Besides having a boutique, Sophie dreamt of becoming an actress or a fashion designer.

Q.16. What was incongruous about the delicate bow which fastened the apron string of Sophie’s mother? H.S. ’16

Ans: Returning home from school, Sophie saw that her mother was wearing an apron whose strings were fastened with a delicate bow. It reflected the socio-economic condition of the family. In spite of their poverty, Sophie dreamt of big things of becoming a fashion designer or actress besides having a boutique. This was incongruous about the delicate bow which fastened the apron string of Sophie’s mother.

Q.17. What is the author of the story, ‘Going Places’?  

Ans: A. R. Barton is the author of the story ‘Going Places’.

B. Long Answer Type Questions (Each 5 marks)

Q.1. Why does Sophie feel close to her brother Geoff more than anyone else in the family? What does he symbolise to her?

Ans: Geoff was the only person in the family with whom Sophie shared her thoughts and secrets. He listened to Sophie’s fantasy and cherished dreams. Her father was aggressive and neglected her fantastic stories. Derek, the younger brother of Sophie, made fun of her stories.  It was only Geoff who shared her fantasy and to whom she unlocked her heart. 

From her perspective, Geoff symbolises elder brother who has grown up. He speaks softly with her so as not to break her heart.

Q.2. What do you learn about the socio-economic status of Sophie’s family?

Ans: Sophie belonged to a middle-class family. The economic condition of the family was not satisfactory. Sophie, who was a school-going young girl, longed for a better way of life which she could not find. Hence she liked to take shelter in a fantastic world. But her classmate Jansie was realistic who remarked that Sophie was ear-marked for the biscuit factory. About Sophie’s family status, we come to know from the fact that when Sophie entered the home she saw that her father’s face was still grubby and sweaty after the day’s hard work. Again she saw that her mother was stooping over the chin and there was dirty washing piled up in the corner. Her brother Geoff was an apprentice mechanic.

All these show us that Sophie’s family was a middle-class poor family. 0 0 0

 Ready Guide H S 2nd Yr English Prose

MEMOIRS OF CHOTA SAHIB

– John Rowntree

TEXTUAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

THINK AS YOU READ-I

Q.1. Briefly describe the scene observed by the author from the veranda of his bungalow on the bank of the Brahmaputra. H.S. ’20

Ans: The bungalow of the author was situated on the south bank of the Brahmaputra. In front of the bungalow, there was a raised portico from which the narrator and his companions had a splendid view of the river Brahmaputra and the Himalayas. In the centre, there was the Peacock Island with a Hindu temple. The dome of the temple was visible through the trees. Though the island was called ‘Peacock Island’, there was not a single peacock, but only monkeys.

Q.2. What is the belief about the dividing channel between Peacock Island and the mainland of Guwahati that the author mentions? H.S. ’15

Ans: It was believed that if the channel between Peacock Island and the mainland of Guwahati ever dried up completely, it would indicate the end of the British Raj. In some years, it was about to dry up. The writer said that he was ignorant whether in the time of independence of India, the channel got dried up or not. Because he would be no longer in Guwahati at that time.

Q.3. What does the author say about the importance of Guwahati? Is the statement true in our time today also?

Ans: The author says that Guwahati was the port of entry into Assam. Most travellers passed through on their way between Kolkata and Shillong or to other places.  This is true even today because Guwahati is the gateway to North-east India.

THINK AS YOU READ-II

Q.1. What character of the North Bank of the Brahmaputra does the author refer to?

Ans: The North Bank of the Brahmaputra had its own characteristics. It was a vast remote stretch of flat, ageless land between the sandbanks of the Brahmaputra and the Himalayan foothills. It was a strange place where the rivers dried up in the hot weather and suddenly disappeared underground.

Q.2. What information does the author give us about Manas Wild Life Sanctuary?

or

What does Rowntree say about the river banks of the Manas Sanctuary? H.S. ’17 

Ans: The author said that the Manas Wild Life Sanctuary was on the border of Bhutan. There few rhinos were found but it was full of fishes.

Q.3. Describe the author’s experience of crossing a flooded river on horseback on the North Bank of the Brahmaputra. H.S. ’16

or

Relate Rowntree’s experiences of flood in Assam. H. S. ’18

Ans: Once the author crossed a flooded river on horse-back. He persuaded the horse to plunge into the water, then slipped over his croup and hung on to its tail. Again when the author pushed the horse to the right, it veered to the left and when he pushed to the left the horse veered to the right. But eventually, he could make a safe landing on the other side of the river.

THINK AS YOU READ-III

Q.1. Relate the author’s experiences of the road accident during the monsoon on the North Bank. (Marks – 5)

Ans: Once the author was touring with his family on the north bank of the Brahmaputra and was caught in the monsoon rain. Although the road was still motorable, driving became very risky. The roads were increasingly greasy. Finally, they slithered over the edge into a paddy field some six feet below the road. Paddy fields were divided into small enclosures by low banks so that floodwater would not run away. However, they found a way back to the road. In the car, there were the author, his wife, the child, ayah and their servants. Fortunately, not a single spring of the car was broken and the family was safe.

Q.1. Relate the author’s reminiscence of the forest bungalow at Kulsi. (5 Marks)

Ans: There were two comfortable bungalows in the forest. One was at Kulsi and the other was at Rajapara. The bungalow at Kulsi was very beautifully situated on a wooded spur above the river. The second was also beautiful but in the roof of the bungalow, there were bats. The bungalow at Kulsi was favourite to the author. The bungalow was surrounded by teak plantation, planted some sixty years before.

ADDITIONAL QUESTION-ANSWERS

A. Short Type Answers (Each 1 / 2 marks)

Q.1. What is the lesson ‘Memoirs of Chota Sahib’ all about?

Ans: The lesson ‘Memoirs of Shota Sahib’ is a brief but vivid account of Guwahati and its neighbouring areas on the eve of the independence of India as seen by the author John Rowntree.

Q.2. What did the author observe about the bheel at Rajapara?

Ans: Close to the Rajapara Forest Bungalow there was a large bheel. An earthquake had once lowered the surface and the land became inundated with water. It was a strange spot rose out of the water which was a reminder that it had once been dry land.

Q.3. Name the places where two bungalows were situated?

Ans: The names of the places of the two bungalows are- Kulsi and Rajapara.

Q.4. Name three plants mentioned in the essay.

Ans: The three plants mentioned in the essay are sal, teak and rubber.

Q.5. Why did Rowntree dislike the forest bungalow at Rajapara?

Ans: No doubt, the Forest Bungalow at Rajapara was beautiful and charming; but the author disliked the bungalow because of the presence of a large number of bats which lived in the roof and lent their fusty smell to the bungalow and its surroundings.

Q.6. What did they have to do to get clean water in the camp?

Ans: In the camp, clean water could be had by using alum into water.

Q.7. Who is the ‘Chota Sahib’ in the ‘Memoirs of Chota Sahib’? H.S. ’15, ’18

Ans: John Rowntree is the ‘Chota Sahib’ in the ‘Memoirs of Chota Sahib’. He was the last British Senior Conservator of the Forests of Assam

Q.8. Who was John Rowntree?

Ans: John Rowntree was the last British senior conservator of Forests of Assam.

Q.9. By what name is the ‘Peacock Island’ popularly known?

Ans: The ‘Peacock Island’ is popularly known as ‘Umananda’.

Q.10. What is ‘pug marks’?

Ans: ‘Pug marks’ are footprints of animals.

Q.11. What is ‘Assam Cheetal’?

Ans: Assam Cheetal is a kind deer locally known as ‘Phutuki Harin’.

Q.12. What is a ‘mar boat’ and how is it operated? H.S. ’19

Ans: ‘Mar boat’ is a ferry consist of plank platform covering two open boats placed alongside one another.

The mar boats were either paddled to cross the river or connected by a cable to another stretched across the river.  These boats were propelled from one side to other by the force of the current of the river. 

Q.13. What position did John Rowntree hold before leaving Shillong of few days after independence? H.S. ’16, ’20

Ans: John Rowntree held the post of the Senior Conservator of Forest of Assam before leaving Shillong.

Q.14. Where did John Rowntree and his family make their first home at Guwahati? H.S. ’17

Ans: John Rowntree and his family made their first home at Guwahati on the bank of the river Brahmaputra.

Q.15. How did John Rowntree find the weather when he arrived at Guwahati? H.S. ’18

Ans: When John Rowntree arrived at Guwahati, he found the weather bearable and a little cold. 

Q.16. What unusual visitor did Rowntree have in his bungalow one night? H.S. ’18

Ans: One night John Rowntree found some pugmarks in the compound of his bungalow. It was imprints of a tiger. Thus a tiger was the unusual visitor that Rowntree had in his bungalow one night.

Q. 17. How clean water could be had in the camp at Guwahati? 

Ans: In the camp, clean water could be had by using alum into water.

Q.18. Give a brief description of Peacock Island? H.S. ’16,  ’19

Ans: The bungalow of John Rowntree was situated on the bank of the river Brahmaputra. A splendid view of the Brahmaputra and the Himalayas were could be viewed from his bungalow. There was an island called ‘The Peacock Island’. It was at the centre of the river.  There was a Hindu temple the dome of which could be seen through the trees. He thought that the Peacock Island was full of peacocks. But in reality, he found not a single peacock but only monkeys. 

*The End*

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